Tag Archives: Brexit

How PC Gaming Is Driving AI, Cars, and the UK Treasury’s Technology Policy

At CES 2017 back in January, Jen-Hsun Huang, CEO of Nvidia announced that “GPU-powered deep learning is driving the ability for computers to perceive the world… But one day, AI researchers met the GPU and the big bang of AI occurred.” Up until more recently, when most ICT analysts thought of Nvidia, the first thing to come to mind would have been gaming, and for a good reason. The core of Nvidia’s business is still PC Gaming where they continue to dominate the GFX hardware market. Jen-Hsun went on to explain that the “GPU had the benefit of being fuelled by the largest entertainment industry in the world, video games.” Indeed, PC gaming is one of the most processing-intensive activities a PC can be asked to perform, and that industry has gone from strength to strength over the past few years. Jen-Hsun was right to tout the success of PC gaming: CONTEXT’s data shows that sales of high-end VR-ready PCs shot up 1057% in terms of revenue y/y for the top 6 EU economies in Q4 2016, and figures from the Entertainment Retailers Association put gaming as contributing more to the UK economy in 2016 than either music or video sales at £2.96bn.

Several thousand miles away from Sin City, the importance of AI and driverless cars was being carefully noted by strategists and civil servants in Whitehall, culminating in the most recent budget announcement. The British government has promised £270m in funding for disruptive technologies such as driverless cars, AI, and robotics. Given the current hard-Brexit policies being pursued by Teresa May’s administration they are wise to support such green shoots; CONTEXT’s figures for professional GPUs back both this decision and Jen-Hsun’s assertion. Screen Shot 2017-03-16 at 13.21.25Sales of professional GPUs in the UK reversed a previous decline in Q3 2016, with Nvidia’s own Quadro series of GFX cards enjoying +25% y/y growth in revenue. More and more GPUs are being purchased to power deep learning and AI for large datacentres, rather than in their more traditional roles for 3D modelling and computer aided design.

It’s not uncommon for devices to be developed with one purpose in mind then being very successfully appropriated for another. Even Atari’s failed Jaguar gaming console ended up being cannibalised and used in dental equipment. The GPU is also the critical lynchpin of another emerging technology: Virtual Reality. In one profound statement, Jen-Hsun declared that “…all gaming was Virtual Reality,” and in many cases this rings true where a player inhabits a virtual world. It might not seem immediately obvious, but components built for PC gaming now power both AI and VR. As a result Nvidia’s share price has soared in recent months, finishing 2016 +224% up from the previous year, and promising to continue to rise as their partnerships and new ventures bear fruit, with professional visualization growing +11%, datacentre at +144% and automotive up +52% for Q4 2016.

This success eventually caused Nvidia’s shares to drop in February when the Q4 results were released as investors weighed up the risks of long-term returns (as driverless cars are still many years away from being commonplace), versus selling stock at an apex. To some extent, the UK government is taking a gamble on driverless cars becoming the norm, and this might reflect the modest £270 sum compared with much higher investment promised by other governments. Academic commentators have also welcomed this news due to the environmental benefits promised by AI-driven vehicles. The immediate future of AI and its importance to the UK economy is very encouraging, but much like Brexit, the longer-term outlook is beyond the most complex algorithm to accurately portend.

by JW

 

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Filed under Big data, Connectivity, gaming, IoT, Mobile technology, Smart Technology

Despite continued uncertainty over Brexit, consumers must spend now to avoid price hikes

UK consumers’ confidence in their ability to weather the uncertainty around Brexit continues to slide as we approach the most crucial shopping period of the year, according to the latest Retail Pulse UK Survey carried out by CONTEXT. Across a range of criteria, the Great British public are shying away from spending. On top of this, UK retailers are getting ready to raise prices early next year as the pound continues to perform poorly. This means consumers have a choice to make; buy now – even though they’re unsure about their finances – or delay purchases and pay more later.

The CONTEXT Retail Pulse Survey is published quarterly, and examines consumer sentiment towards the UK economy and personal finances. The report for Q2 2016 showed that people 65 years and above were very bullish on Brexit—indeed, many of those surveyed likely favoured withdrawal from the EU. But just five months later, confidence in the future prospects of the economy from this age group has fallen significantly. While 42 per cent of UK 65+’s expected positive economic performance in July 2016,  feelings have swung massively in the opposite direction with 44 per cent now believing the economy will get worse.

Anxiety about the economy is also creeping into everyday purchasing decisions by all age groups. Consumers in the UK are now two times less likely to invest in electrical products—including smartphones, TVs, and notebooks— than they were in July. This is due to increased worries about the state of personal finances, with one third of all those questioned agreeing they will cut back on electrical purchases due to just this one factor alone.

The CONTEXT Retail Pulse Survey reveals the current trepidation felt in the UK. With the European Commission slashing its growth forecast for the UK for 2017, many expect inflation to rise. Factor in a weak pound, and an uncertain jobs market, it’s no surprise to see UK consumers thinking of cutting back their spending on consumer technology.

Taken as a whole, the Survey suggests a potential negative impact on retailers this holiday season, with Black Friday almost upon them. There is – however – a bright spot: stores looking to make a success of the imported American event and the run-up to Christmas should look to young professionals aged 25-34. According to the CONTEXT Survey, 22 per cent of this age group think their personal finances will improve—the most positive sentiment of any age group—and 19 per cent say they will spend more on electricals in the next quarter.

There are also other indicators in the CONTEXT Survey that suggest UK consumers may be willing to spend, despite their uncertainty. Household saving now stands at 5.1 per cent, a return to the low levels last seen just before the global financial crisis. Unsecured borrowing is also rising, reaching a 10.3 per cent year-on-year increase. This could indicate a more carefree attitude to spending amongst younger demographics. Those savvy enough to see price rises coming could increase the overall spending and make this holiday season a success for the industry.

by AS

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Filed under Retail, Retail in CONTEXT